‘Aaaall…. All Star Squares! The fun and the laughter, forget all your cares!”


This week sees the first instalment in my latest three-part series of patented How To Win Game Shows Behind-The-Scenes Reminiscences (TM).

Or HTWGSBTSR (TM). Catchy, eh?

And this time around, I’m talking about the 1999 game show All-Star Squares. This was a short-lived adventure for me as a game show question writer, given that the show only lasted for about six months…


All-Star Squares was essentially a reboot and re-branding of the classic game show The Hollywood Squares (known in some territories as Celebrity Squares, and in Japan as 3 TIMES 3 IS QUIZ! Seriously.) This show had been on Australian TV before, back in late sixties, and again in 1981… and then in 1999 The Powers That Be at Channel Seven decided it was time for a reboot.

I must have heard about it through the grapevine in late 1998. At that stage, I’d just finished my first year as a full-time professional TV writer on the daily afternoon show Denise and had also served time as a gag writer for In Melbourne Tonight, which was my second professional TV writing gig, after submitting sketches and jokes for Full Frontal.

Anyway, the point is, that the word went around that this new game show was looking for gag writers who could also write general knowledge questions. Although I was writing for BackBerner at the time, I figured this was part-time, and I could fit it in too, so I jumped at the chance. Among others, I found myself working with my long-time writing colleague and best friend Vin Hedger, and Adam Richard, both of whom I’ve interviewed for this site.

I remember that, in attempts to make each other laugh, Adam and I would often rework the opening lyrics to the All Star Squares theme song. As you can hear here, the original is;

“Aaaall…. All Star Squares! The fun and the laughter, forget all your cares!”

But Adam and I came up with alternative versions, including, but not limited to;

“Aaaall…. All Star Squares! Some folks like straight trousers, but others wear flares!”

“Aaaall…. All Star Squares! Male horses are stallions, and females are mares!”

“Aaaall…. All Star Squares! You can’t catch the train if you don’t pay your fares!”

And various others that I’m not able to repeat here on a family-friendly blog.

All-Star Squares was a unique gig for a joke writer, not to mention a question writer. If you’re unfamiliar with the format of the show, it’s essentially Noughts & Crosses (or Tic-Tac-Toe)… In order to score a point, the contestant chooses one of 9 celebrities, and the host asks that celebrity a general knowledge question. When the celebrity answers, the contestant decides whether the celebrity is right or wrong. If the contestant decides correctly, they score a point.

We writers were asked to submit questions for the show in batches; I think there might have been 20 questions per batch. And for each of those 20 questions, we had to provide:

  • The question,
  • The correct answer to the question,
  • One incorrect (but potentially convincing) answer to the question,
  • One joke answer to the question,
  • And two solid references to verify the accuracy of the question and its correct answer.

If memory serves, they paid us less than $5 a question for all that. Coming up with a fresh, interesting, usable question – and all of those other elements particularly a joke answer that would work, given the restrictions of the show (family audience, 5:30 time-slot, celebrities with varying degrees of comic ability, conservative network execs, etc, etc) – would often take one to two hours. They’d never get away with paying us so poorly now, and I’m not sure why we all said “Yes” to the deal back then.

Young and hungry for work, I suppose.


Next week, as this HTWGSBTSR (TM) continues, I’ll take you through the pre-show process of prepping the celebrities in the Green Room. This was the weekly ritual before they all ventured out onto the studio floor and climbed up into their nine individual, hermetically sealed celebrity cells…

Until then, please do try to forget all your cares.




Game shows: The Cutting Edge

A photo of the primordial soup, snapped billions and billions of years ago.

The Game Show has been a highly adaptable form of entertainment, since The Very Dawn of Time. 

Well, maybe not the very dawn of time… I mean, the earliest unicellular lifeforms drifting about in the primordial soup probably weren’t all that great at pop culture, geography, or sports trivia. Word puzzles? They’d have been useless. Guessing which briefcase contained the big money? Not a chance in hell. And of course they didn’t stand a chance when the subject was history.

Because there hadn’t been any yet.

No, come to think of it, game shows have not been adaptable since The Very Dawn of Time, and I’m now sorry I wrote that. But game shows are adaptable these days. And that, I think, is the point of this week’s guest post from Mr Ryan Vickers. Now read on… 


My Life in Game Shows

Episode 14: Game show as technology – ‘Complete the List’, 2017

With the advent of so many different platforms such as Netflix filling in for what used to have been our television watching, something else great has come down the chute – podcasting and apps. And with podcasting and apps has come internet game shows. Played mostly for pride and not for prizes, this allows anyone with an internet connection to play from the comfort of their home. The hottest thing going right now is HQ Trivia, an app whereby hundreds of thousands of players try to get twelve questions in a row right for a split of the game’s cash prize. In fact, for three seasons Let’s Ask America ran in US television syndication and while the host was in the studio contestants were on Skype at home.

In the traditional game show vein, Complete the List is a podcast game show run by Canada’s Andy Saunders (disclaimer: I have known Andy for years, and he is the tournament director at Reach for the Top, and he does a damn good job!). After hearing a few episodes, I knew I wanted to apply, and it was a simple as filling out a Google Form.

PRO TIP: Podcast game shows are always looking for players – why not have a try at Complete the List yourself?

Three players (and on occasion teams) are given a list of eight categories, in the vein of Pyramid, whereby you’ll have to decipher what they actually mean and that’s part of the fun. Players give answers in turn, in an attempt to score points. But in a neat twist, if you can’t think of another answer you can copy someone else’s – well, at least if you think it’s right! Other rounds include having to name a year a series of events happened as well as answering a question within a certain numerical range.

I first played on Episode 21, whereby to my surprise, I was against two other Canadians. It turns out Andy had prepared a slate of questions that were Canadian-themed. I then started to try and figure out what the categories might mean.

PRO TIP: On a show like this, pen and paper are not only allowed, but you need to use them. When a category came up, I started to scribble down possible answers. When it came to the “name the year”, I divided everything up by decade. Also make sure to take time to write down what other contestants had said so I wouldn’t repeat answers where I didn’t want to.

One of the great things about this podcast is the variety of questions – I’ve had to name countries who produced a Tour de France winner, Canadian Prime Ministers, currently running soap operas, characters from The Hunger Games and so many more things. As well the calibre of contestants has been quite high – the second of two episodes I played against two recent Jeopardy! contestants – one of who made it to the semi-finals of the recently finished Tournament of Champions.

And while this show only plays for pride, there is tons of it at stake. You can hear me play on episodes #21 and #25 wherever you find your podcasts – just search for Complete the List!

Next time, my life in game shows comes to a conclusion – well… for now…


Well, the game show as a podcast – who would have thought? I’d like to thank Ryan for once again opening my eyes to a new corner of the game show universe that I was completely unaware of, before he came along. That was, as he mentioned, the penultimate instalment of his Life In Game Shows guest post odyssey…. but before he returns for one last round, perhaps you’d like to follow him on Twitter, at @RealCanadaMan.

And just a reminder that you can follow me too, at @How2WinGameShow.

Until next time!

The Trivia Championships of North America!

Hello! Guest blogger Ryan Vickers is back again this week to take us through a trivia-related phenomenon that I had never even heard of – shame on me! Now read on…


My Life in Game Shows

Episode 13 – Meeting with like-minded folks – TCONA / ‘Game Show Throwdown’, 2017

In the world of fan conventions – because geek is now chic – Comic Con is come-one-come-all for everything pop culture in San Diego, California. Musical Theatre fans have Broadway Con in New York City.

But what does that leave for us game show (and trivia) aficionados? The Trivia Championships of North America (TCONA)! Held in Vegas every year, this has some loose connections to the previous “Game Show Congress” which occurred during the 2000s but truly today TCONA stands on its own. Trivia players from all around the world (including game show writers, contestants and talent) attend and play in events such as LearnedLeague Live, Last Quizzer Standing, and Total Recall about Strange Happenings (TRASH). There’s something for everyone.

It also means there is a boatload of game show contestants there.

PRO TIP: If you ever find yourself at an event whereby there are this many game show contestants, make sure to ask them about their experiences! And furthermore, ask them what they did to get on that show that you want to get on!

I’m not joking about the alumni – far from it. My quiz bowl team included two people that had reached the $500,000 level on Who Wants to be a Millionaire and a Lingo champ, for example. I ran into alumni of shows like Win Ben Stein’s Money, The $100,000 Pyramid, Whammy!, Jeopardy!, Wheel of Fortune, Weakest Link, $ale of the Century… and the list goes on and on and on…

On a personal level, I had a blast. It was not only great getting to meet all of these wonderful game show people, but it was also the activities as well. I went with a friend to see a taping of Millionaire and got to stand on the set where the host stands and actually “host” a question. I spent time playing Jeopardy! with actual Jeopardy! alumni in someone’s hotel room. I played trivia titans in a 15-player head-to-head game of Last Quizzer Standing (similar to Britain’s Fifteen-To-One) where I came in fifth place.

PRO TIP: Don’t play your cards early if you don’t need to. In this fifteen-player quiz battle, I might not have been the strongest but gave confident answers and then did not make eye contact during the second round (where players nominated other players to answer) which helped me make it as far as I did. Know the rules of the game and figure out how they can work to your advantage!

I also had one of the best nights of my life with approximately twenty other Wheel of Fortune alumni with dinner at a restaurant (where someone did the math and there was over $300,000 in winnings at that table alone!) and then a nightcap singing karaoke with those fine people. Don’t get me wrong – I had a great time but I’m not posting the footage!

The highlight of the weekend for me was raising money for childrens’ hospitals across North America. As part of a group that put on the “2017 Game Show Throwdown” we raised over $7,000 by playing different game shows for 24 hours with contestants from the TCONA audience. You’d be surprised, but I got to host a cult-Canadian game show at 4 am and it was a blast. We live streamed on the internet so everyone could watch as well!

PRO TIP: If an opportunity comes where you can use your game show skills to give back, please try and do it! I have helped out with events at various locations and trust me, it will warm your heart. Not to mention you’ll have funny anecdotes to tell for years to come based on the answers that players give!

I can’t wait to go back!


Thanks for the heads-up, Ryan; I was completely unaware of the existence of this event. It sounds like a lot of fun! Hopefully I’ll manage to get there one day. 

One day….


Ryan Makes A Deal

Hello, and again Happy New Year again, from all of us here at HowToWinGameShows.com!

And when I say ”all of us”, of course I actually mean “me”. 

Our guest blogger Ryan Vickers (by which I actually mean “my guest blogger Ryan Vickers”)  is back this week, with Episode 12 of His Life In Game Shows…

So take it away, Ryan!


Ryan and his friend Terri on ‘Let’s Make A Deal’

My Life in Game Shows

Episode 12 – Going with your gut – Let’s Make A Deal, 2017

I’m pretty lucky that as a teacher (my main job) and my hosting of Reach for the Top (the secondary gig) allows for a structured summer holiday schedule. This year I was committed to be in Detroit, Michigan for a sporting event and then in Las Vegas for a trivia convention (which I’ll talk about in a future entry). There was some time in between and one thing led to another and I soon found myself with a friend from work once again in Los Angeles.

As per my previous visit to La La Land, I had booked tickets to The Price is Right and Let’s Make A Deal.

PRO TIP: If you’re serious about getting on an audience participation show such as Price or Deal, bookmark the website for ticketing and check it daily so you can get tickets when the date first becomes available. Also consider calling the ticketing agent – often you won’t get a date guarantee but you can at least establish a reasonable window of time when they will tape. The agency that deals with Price, Deal and Match Game, for example, gives out priority tickets (get there at 8:59 AM for a 9 AM call and you’ll get in) and general tickets (which seats after priority). All it takes is a bit of time!

The first show was The Price is Right. I was delighted to have to mark an “X” on my contestant qualification number as a badge of honour (as I was on the show previously) and it lead to many fun conversations in line.

The second show was Let’s Make A Deal. On and off since 1963 (and currently in season nine) it has evolved from a calm affair at the beginning to the Halloween party for the audience that it has become.

Similar to Price, Deal has players line up and do “speed dating” interviews. One thing that was a bit different from Deal that I remembered from two years previous was that they might ask what game was your favourite and why – so we spent a good half hour the night before verifying the names of games, just in case.

PRO TIP: Lots of people have been on lots of game shows – so do your research and see how their experience was!

In line, my friend Terri went first and then I went second. The interview went well and then we were led into a holding area where we could improve our costumes, take pictures, mingle with other audience members and watch some previous episodes. We kept our energy up – not because we needed to, but because we were having such a darn good time!

PRO TIP: Pay attention to information before the show. We were told, for example, to try and avoid going away empty handed if we were chosen. The staff made sure we knew that if we took the cash bribe that it would indeed be cold hard cash we’d be winning!

About an hour later, during the show Wayne Brady (the host) said he’s looking for two friends… and then pointed at us! As excited as I was to get on the show, I was so happy that my friend was picked as well!

You can see our time on the show here.

Afterwards, much like on Price, once the show was done we were put into a room to deal (ha!) with all of our prizes. In fact, as I type this, I am thrilled to know that one of my prizes will be in my apartment by New Year’s Eve and we will celebrate with it!

PRO TIP: Say Thank You to the prize staff. They are nice people and basically they are giving you FREE STUFF. If for some reason you choose to decline any prize (due to space issues, for example) be polite about it! You never know if you’ll meet these people on another game show!

Next time I’ll talk about a meeting of the game show minds – where we could swap game show war stories!


Congratulations, Ryan – that looks like a fun prize. We don’t have Let’s Make A Deal here, so I’m a little unfamiliar with the format. I do remember, however, writing this post about the logic you should use when confronted with the infamous Let’s Make A Deal door dilemma, back in 2015. It’s a classic mathematical conundrum, and often proves quite controversial… If you’re considering going on Let’s Make A Deal, I’d strongly suggest you have a look at the post.

See you next time!


Happy New Year, from www.HowToWinGameShows.com!

Thanks Steve, I’ll take it from here.

Just a quick one today, to wish you all a safe, happy and prosperous 2018!

May the coming 365 days be filled with love, laughter and light for you. And if you’ll be taking the plunge and appearing on a game show, please add ‘cash’ and ‘fabulous prizes’ to that list.

In 2018, I plan to continue posting here every week, and providing as many tips, hints, interviews and behind-the-scenes stories as I possibly can. And if there’s anything in particular that you’d like to see here on HowToWinGameShows.com in 2018, please don’t hesitate to let me know! I can be reached, as always, at Stephen@HowToWinGameShows.com

Now I’ll leave you to get on with all those New Year’s Resolutions… good luck!


Ryan comes on down to ‘The Price Is Right’!

Hello! I hope you had a great Christmas yesterday, and Happy Boxing Day to you!

We’re hearing again from our guest blogger Ryan Vickers today, and this time he takes us through his experience on a show that’s pretty much an American institution – The Price Is Right.

There are some great tips too, so if you’re harbouring an ambition to ‘Come on Down’, read on….


My Life in Game Shows

Episode 11 – Sick day viewing: ‘The Price is Right’, 2015.

When I was a kid in the 80s, Canadian and American television game shows were a dime a dozen in daytime television. You hoped that if you got sick, your parents would at least let you watch the glitz and glamour of these spectacles. I loved shows such as Scrabble, Blackout, Super Password and $ale of the Century.

Over the years, daytime game shows have for the most part gone the way of the wind. Yes there are syndicated offerings that pay in daytime hours, but the only true ones on network television are The Price is Right (since 1972!) and the current reboot of Let’s Make a Deal (which I’ll get to in the next entry).

The Price is Right is as classic game show as you’re getting to get, from the heyday of game shows of the last century. A smiling host, a jubilant announcer, an audience that clearly has come expecting a rock concert and prizes galore; and it also boils down to a simple premise: guess how much something costs, without going over.

I had been twice previously to Price in the 2000s but it had been a good ten years since my last visit.

PRO TIP: If you’ve auditioned for a show before, try to remember how the last time went. What did they ask? What do you think they were looking for?

Armed with that thought, I made attempt number three at trying to get on the show. I felt I had interacted well with the contestant picker that day and waited to see my fate. But I didn’t just rest on my laurels… I made sure that I interacted with other people while we were waiting in line (not that it took that much effort – I’m a people person!) and made sure my energy was at full capacity when we were ushered into the studio.

PRO TIP: Assume someone’s always watching. That could be in the form of a staff member either behind or in front of the scenes. Give them the best impression and you never know what could happen!

And then I heard those magical words…


Continue reading

Merry Christmas, from HowToWinGameShows.com!


In case you’re wondering, this boy in the 70s haircut and tiny lemon yellow shorts is NOT me.                                                                                                                                                                                             Nor is the monkey in a nightie.


Just a quick one today to wish you and yours a very, very happy Christmas. Whether you’re Christian, Atheist, Agnostic, Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim, Rastafarian, Pastafarian, Sikh or Zoroastrian, please accept my very best wishes for you, your family and your friends this festive season.

Because no matter what our varying spiritual beliefs may be, surely we can all wish each other well. We’re all just people muddling along, and doing the best we can to try and make sense of it all. The things we have in common far outweigh our few superficial differences.

A very happy, safe and kind holiday season to you and yours, and may 2018 bring all that you wish for…. and then just a little bit more.

Peace, love and light.


‘Letters and Numbers’ and what might have been… Part II.


If you saw last week’s post, catchily titled That Time I Auditioned For The Australian Version Of That Long-Running Quiz Show ‘Countdown’ Up In Sydney in 2010, you’ll know that I’d been asked to audition to host, and that Matt Parkinson had too. Now read on….


The other contender for the host role on the day – who loomed very large – was Silvio Rivier. Silvio was an SBS personality, who’d been at the network since 1980, and had worked in a number of roles there, but most notably, as the long term presenter of Global Village. I didn’t meet him on the day, but I did note that he walked through the foyer with a deal of self-assurance. I thought that his appointment as host of Letters and Numbers was a lay down misere. He was already part of the SBS family, and for a network with multicultural diversity at its very core, I thought he was a far more attractive option for them than ‘white-bread’ me…. and similarly ‘white-bread’ Matt Parkinson. I was absolutely certain that Silvio would get the gig, and that they’d only got Matt and me there for a bit of variety, and to maybe see a couple of different takes on the role. Perhaps they figured they could work anything they liked from our performances in to Silvio‘s performance, when he got the gig.

Silvio Rivier

Afterwards, Matt and I shared a taxi back to the airport, had a well-earned beer in the airport bar, and sat next to each other again on the plane back to Melbourne. We were philosophical. I’d done what I did (which is being me, and nobody else can be me), and he did what he did (which is being him, and nobody else can be him). Now it was in the lap of the gods. Either;

  • They wanted Matt to host Letters and Numbers,
  • They wanted me to host Letters and Numbers, or
  • They wanted someone else to host Letters and Numbers.

Neither of us felt we’d missed any opportunities in our auditions, or left anything in the tank. Back at Melbourne Airport, we shook hands, jumped into our separate taxis and went home.

Flying up to Sydney to audition and then flying home again afterwards is something that I’ve done a few times. I always find it to be quite an exhausting day; it’s essentially 3 to 4 hours of travel, and then TURN ON THE CHARM AND GIVE IT ALL YOU’VE GOT and then another 3 to 4 hours of travel to get home again. Nervous energy levels do tend to go up and down a bit on days like those.

A couple of weeks later, I found out that I didn’t get the gig.

And that Matt Parkinson didn’t get the gig.

And that Silvio Rivier didn’t get the gig either.

The job of hosting Letters and Numbers went to former newsreader Richard Morecroft.

Richard Morecroft

So much for my “no white-bread” theory! I was really pleased to see that Lily got the gig of the glamorous mathematician, and she did it brilliantly and charmingly, and it has since led to a lot of other things for her. So happy for her – she was a really lovely person.

Lily Serna

When I watched the show, and saw Richard’s style of hosting, I thought “Well, that’s what he does, and that’s obviously what they wanted”. In my audition, I offered something quite different, which obviously wasn’t what they wanted. Which brings me to something I always try to remind myself, whenever I audition for anything… “Just do you. Nobody else can do you, and you do it really well. If you doing you doesn’t fit into their project, then so be it. But if you doing you does fit into their project, you’re golden!” Being chosen or not chosen for jobs like this is never personal;  It’s just whether I happen to be a jigsaw piece that fits into their puzzle… or not.

The postscript to all of this is that although the French version of the show is still running after more than 20,000 episodes, and the English version is still running after more than 6000, episodes, the Australian version of the show was cancelled after 450 episodes, for whatever reason. It’s a shame; Letters and Numbers was a friendly, fun show that took pleasure in celebrating smart people.

And in the current landscape, I reckon there’s not enough of that about.

‘Letters and Numbers’ and what might have been… Part I.

Hello! Today – and next week as well – a little trip down my (slightly uneven, pothole-riddled) Memory Lane, for you, Dear Reader, as HowToWinGameShows.com presents a little two-part post that I like to call…..

That Time I Auditioned For The Australian Version Of That Long-Running Quiz Show ‘Countdown’ Up In Sydney in 2010.

Catchy, eh? Now read on…



Countdown. If you know your game shows, you’ll know that this simple yet very successful show has clocked up over 6000 episodes in the UK since it started there in 1982. And its French antecedent Des chiffres et des lettres has had more than 20,000 episodes since it started in 1965!

In 2010, I got word from my agent that the SBS Network would be producing an Australian version – called Letters and Numbers – very soon, and that they’d started looking for the on air team.

At this time, I’d had my game show victories, and had spent quite a bit of time on The Einstein Factor’s ‘Brains Trust’, and so I had some fairly solid TV quiz show credentials. My background in acting and stand-up comedy was something that also made them think of me, and so, when the call came through, I thought “Yes! I’d love to audition! I’d love to be a quiz show host on the big people’s television!”

So we booked in the audition, a time was arranged (in Sydney, which would mean a flight from Melbourne, where I live), and I started doing my research on the show. I quickly found that Countdown is a pretty sedate affair. When I played along, I realised that words and anagrams are much more my strong point then mathematics, so when it came to the mathematical equations, I was struggling a little bit… But I figured “well… I was only going to be the host; I didn’t need to know all THIS stuff”.

Eventually, the day of the audition came. I got a good night’s sleep, had a decent breakfast, put on my new suit, got all my notes together and made my way to the airport to catch the flight up to Sydney.

When I got there, I bumped into my pal game show champ, actor and comedian Matt Parkinson. I instantly thought “This is a bit too much of a coincidence…” Sure enough, he was also auditioning for the host role on host on Letters and Numbers that day. I’ve known Matt for many, many years, and he’s as lovely, smart and funny a bloke as you’ll ever meet. These days, he’s starring as one of The Chasers (“Goliath”) on The Chase Australia. He’s fantastic in the role, and that show continues to top the ratings here.

Matt Parkinson

But back in 2010, none of that had happened yet. We greeted each other, and very soon realised that not only were we both going for the same gig…. but the producers had booked us seats next to each other for the flight up to the audition and seats next to each other for the flight back after the audition. Okay, so not awkward at all. Of course, we tried not to think about it, and we genuinely wished each other well, but being in such close proximity to the bloke who’s going for the job that you want, for at least two hours leading up to the audition…

Well, all I can say is that if you happen to be a game show producer, auditioning two people for the host role, maybe don’t force them together for an extended period before they audition for you. I can’t speak for Matt, but it wasn’t especially good for my nerves, and I’d argue that the producer may not have got the ideal, calm, relaxed performance from me that I wanted to give. But maybe I’m imagining all that. When we got to Sydney, we jumped in a cab and went out to the Screen Australia studios at Lindfield to audition.

The auditions consisted of a few more games, with David Astle (who had already, I think, won the role of the dictionary expert). David was a natural choice for this role, having been a brilliant compiler of cryptic crosswords, non-fiction author, and self-confessed “word nerd” for many years.

On the day, they were also auditioning two young mathematicians for the Carol Vorderman role. One was a very tall, blonde model-looking type, with a Russian background. She was super, super confident, and a brilliant mathematician as well, of course. The other was Lily Serna, who was delightful, and charming and very excited to be there. It was her first gig of this type, and her enthusiasm was clear.
In two runs of the show, I auditioned opposite both of them (deep down, I really wanted Lily to get the gig).

I remember in the audition trying to keep it light, trying to keep my energy up, but not too be too manic. This was Countdown, after all. At one stage, the obscure word that David talked about was the word “folderol”; explaining its meaning* and derivation. I remember later on in the run being able to do a callback, and use that word in a sentence. My use of it wasn’t hilarious or anything, but I hoped that at least it showed The Powers That Be that I was paying attention, absorbing new information as it was mentioned, and that I could think on my feet. I did a couple of runs at the show (cut down, maybe just one round each, with crew members standing in as contestants) before Matt went in and had his turn…


Next week, in the thrill-packed conclusion of That Time I Auditioned For The Australian Version Of That Long-Running Quiz Show ‘Countdown’ Up In Sydney in 2010, we find out who got the gig, what happened in the aftermath… and just who was the mysterious extra contender for host on the day?

All this – and more – will be revealed next week, right here at HowToWinGameShows.com!



* folderol

Noun – trivial or nonsensical fuss. “all the folderol of the athletic contests and the cheerleaders”

Now you know.


No post this week….

…. Except for this one.

It’s been a busy few weeks, as I’ve been writing the script for The 7th AACTA Awards Ceremony, which happens tomorrow night. So I’m in Sydney right now, frantically making last minute changes, updates and improvements (hopefully!) to all the various presenter scripts for the Film-and-Television’s-Night-of-Nights-When-The Brightest-Cliches-Come-Out-To-Shine. If you’re in Australia, you can watch the whole thing on the Seven Network and / or Foxtel tomorrow night!

Thanks for your patience, and normal service will resume as soon as possible.

The AACTA Award trophy. And before you ask… No, none of those As stand for “Amputee”.